How to manage a side hustle, podcast, and full-time Job

Taly Matiteyahu went from being a lawyer, to a legal operations expert, to a podcaster and the co-founder of a dating app. And who says we can’t do it all?

With so much on her plate, Taly is always finding ways to be more efficient and organized. Now she’s sharing her experience to teach us how to start a side hustle and manage our time while being kind to ourselves along the way.

Tune in (or read below) to learn why Taly swears by to-do lists, what inspired her voice-first dating app, and why we shouldn’t wait for the mythical “right time” to start a business. 

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Listen to episode 16:

 

In the episode “How to Successfully Manage a Side Hustle, Podcast, and Full-time Job,” we discuss:

  • How Taly balances a full-time job, scaling a side business, and putting out a podcast
  • How and why to triage your tasks
  • The efficiency project that Taly is most proud of and what tools she used to achieve it
  • An introduction to Evisort and how it helps lawyers save time
  • How to sort and implement customer feedback
  • How well-organized internal communication helps teams be more productive and stay up to date
  • How Taly came up with the idea for Blink, the first voice-only dating app, and how she got started 
  • Taly’s top advice for people wanting to launch a side business: take the plunge, start small, and set realistic goals
  • Taly’s productivity hacks: the power or to-do lists and organizing everything in terms of efficiency, even in your space
  • What’s next for Taly: scaling, beta testing, and fundraising for Blink; season two of her Date in a Blink podcast

Favorite quotes

“Since then I've had this kind of idea percolating in my mind of how can we leverage these sorts of experiences and get to know people for who they are rather than what they look like and make deeper connections as a result. Because we're so frequently writing people off based on their hair color, their height, their skin color, to be honest. Our ethnicity, genders, we have all of these assumptions wrapped in based on visual cues and, you know, maybe we could get to know people for deeper things.” - Taly Matiteyahu


“So a tip that my law professor once gave a handful of us, and this was in connection to her having a child, but it applies, I think, broadly: there's never a good time. You just have to take the plunge. In her case, she had a child while she was a Supreme Court clerk. She had a busy, busy life and she still did it. And that was because she wanted to. And I think the same applies here. Building a startup is sort of like having a baby. It's a ton of work. Everyone's gonna give you advice, even if you don't ask it. It's something that can be really scary and daunting, but you just have to take the plunge and dive in and know that you'll figure things out as you go through it.” - Taly Matiteyahu


And if you're working full-time simultaneously, be realistic and kind to yourself because you're not gonna be able to build as fast as other people might expect. Some people might say it should take only three months to do something. If it takes you six or eight or ten, because you're doing other things, that's okay. You should know that that's normal and you don't have to meet other people's expectations in order to meet your own. And so be kind to yourself and just dive in and enjoy the journey.” - Taly Matiteyahu


Once I put something in my to-do list, it's completely gone from my active memory. I don't think about it again. And that really helps me focus on the things that I need to do and the exact moment. Knowing that I'm not forgetting anything. I don't have to worry about anything else. And I know just by having the system that whenever it is that I set that reminder, it's gonna come back up and I'll either deal with it then or find a better time for it.” - Taly Matiteyahu

Meet today’s guest, Taly Matiteyahu

Taly Matiteyahu Headshot

Taly Matiteyahu is the co-founder and CEO of Blink, a voice-first speed dating app, which was inspired by a revelatory experience at a blackout restaurant where Taly befriended fellow diners and felt the power of connecting with others free of looks-driven assumptions.

Taly obtained her Bachelor’s degree from New York University before earning her J.D. from Columbia Law School in 2015. 

After working at a big law firm in NYC, Taly left legal practice for a more dynamic and innovative role in legal operations, first at Datadog and then at Netflix, before transitioning to work as a Product Manager at a legal tech company.

Productivity resources to explore

“How to successfully manage a side hustle, podcast, and full-time Job” full transcript

This transcript has been slightly edited for clarity and readability.

Ben (00:00):

This is Get More Done, a YouCanBook.me podcast. And my name is Ben, your host. Since YouCanBook.me helps millions of people save time each month, the team and I decided to start this podcast to explore productivity and to learn more about how folks manage their day, build systems to scale, and leverage automation. Essentially how they do more with less. On today's episode, I met up with Taly Matiteyahu. Taly pivoted into an operations role after law school because of her love for creating efficiency. She now works as a Product Manager for Evisort, a tool designed to save lawyers time with contracts. Taly also has started a first-of-its-kind dating app called Blink that is built on voice-first connections to remove biases. On top of all that, she manages a podcast called Date in a Blink. During our conversation, she shares her tips on how she's getting all of this done and how to start a side hustle. Enjoy.

Ben (01:02):

Excellent. Welcome back to Get More Done, the podcast all about productivity and crushing of goals. Today, I'm sitting down with Taly Matiteyahu, the Product Manager at Evisort by day, and then by night, the co-founder and CEO of the Blink dating app. So Taly, welcome to the podcast.

Taly (01:20):

Hi, thank you so much for having me.

Ben (01:21):

Yes. I'm excited to dig in to learn how you are managing everything, as we'll get into. But as you may have seen from past episodes, we start with an icebreaker question just to break the nerves up a little bit and get everybody comfortable. So in this episode, I'd love to know, if money and time were no object, what would you be doing right now?

Taly (01:41):

I would be traveling the world with my dogs, which the traveling the world I think I could figure out, but the with the dogs part is an additional complication. But I would definitely use the time and money to figure that out if I could.

Ben (01:53):

Nice, where would be the first place you'd go?

Taly (01:55):

New Zealand, which I've already been to, but I wanna go spend more time exploring. So New Zealand would definitely be at the top of the list.

Ben (02:01):

Oh yeah. New Zealand's great. I hear you don't even have to wear shoes there. Sign me up.

Taly (02:06):

I've never heard that. I did wear shoes when I was there.

Ben (02:09):

Yeah, maybe it was just some wack job I was talking with. So thanks again for being on. And as I mentioned earlier, you know, you have a full-time job, you're scaling a side business, put out a podcast, and all your other efforts as well that you're working on. So how are you doing all this Taly? What is your secret?

Taly (02:30):

I have lots of to-do lists and an incredible support system. So the to-do list is like the day-to-day, what actually helps me get stuff done and make sure I don't forget things. And I use all sorts of to-do lists. I have, you know, reminders on my Mac. I have Asana for work and Blink and all of these things. And it's what helps me remember things and make sure that nothing slips through the cracks. Beyond that, having a co-founder who is incredible and who lifts me up every day when it's hard and energizes me and reminds me of what we're working towards is honestly essential. And then having a life partner who also just picks up the slack, like making dinner and taking our dogs out and running errands when I can't, because I'm juggling so much, is sort of essential. So I'm very lucky.

Ben (03:14):

Yeah, absolutely. I imagine your to-do lists are quite lengthy. So how do you prioritize those? How do you structure that?

Taly (03:21):

I usually kind of do a triage every day or the night before. I'll look over what I have to do. I'll look over my calendar. I'll see what I realistically have time for and anything that's less important or just, I know won't get done, gets bumped. Whether it's a day or a week or to a time that makes more sense. And I just see it as sort of like triage. I don't wanna equate myself to a doctor, but just assessing the important things, and picking the things that are most important and that I can dedicate my time to. Honestly, the other thing is I just stay up late. Probably not the best solution, but when you're juggling a lot and you have essentially two full-time jobs, it happens. It's not something to glorify. It's not something that I wanna maintain forever but it is something that I do in order to get things done.

Ben (04:10):

Yeah. I think the triage idea of just what's bleeding? What's on fire? What needs to happen right away? And then the rest you can let go. And I mean, you need to be prioritizing your health as well. So I hope you're getting some sleep in there.

Taly (04:21):

Not as much as I'd like, but yes, I am getting sleep.

Ben (04:23):

Right. Awesome. So in your past, you were pursuing a career in law, but then you found a ton of inefficiency and moved over to an operations role. So I'd love to learn a little bit more about that journey and any big improvements that you've made in past jobs, like process improvements that you were most proud about.

Taly (04:43):

Yeah. So I really didn't enjoy being at a law firm because, like you said, the inefficiencies, they're almost incentivized to be inefficient because they're billed by the hour. And so that definitely just wasn't the space for me. I like making things more efficient. I like creativity. I like being just kind of more innovative than I was able to be at a firm. And so I transitioned to legal ops and that really let me focus on building efficiencies for in-house legal departments. And those teams often don't have huge budgets. So you have to get really creative and crafty. And in my case, I was hacking a lot of solutions, which was a ton of fun and I really enjoyed it. I would say the kind of, I think your question was what's the one that I was really excited about.

Taly (05:23):

The one that I loved most was one that I did at Netflix. They have an incredible product org there that supports the internal workings of Netflix, but there are still a lot of gaps. And so one of the things that I did was create an Airtable that syncs data from all of these different apps and filled in some of the places that weren't being filled. Some of the gaps that existed in the product ecosystem. Essentially, I was using it to trigger notifications using Zapier that we weren't getting through our automated systems. I used it to make deal data searchable and reportable so that people can also say like, "Hey, I'm negotiating X type of deal. I wanna see similar deals that meet these parameters." And we could very easily slice and dice it using structured data.

Taly (06:06):

And so it was just a lot of fun to essentially create a tool that can be melded into all different uses just by porting data from other systems and then layering no-code solutions like Zapier on top and whatever else I was using to kind of get crafty. And Airtable in and of itself is pretty incredible with its dashboards, its filtering, and its view creation. So that honestly was kind of an app in and of itself for the team and I just fell in love with Airtable too. So I now use it in other lives. So yeah, that was a fun project to work on.

Ben (06:42):

Yeah that sounds like a massive overhaul of process. So I mean, now looking back on it, it's a huge body of work, but how did you get started in that? How did you kind of chip away and build that up into something as monumental as it turned out to be?

Taly (06:57):

Started with the very basics. And so the idea was, "Oh, let's see if this works." And so we poured over data for a small subset of things. An X amount of data points. And then gradually realized how valuable it was. And so we're like, "Oh, well, let's get this additional data point in. Let's go pull this information in from this other platform and let's start making it more robust." So it kind of grew over time and created all of these new branches. Eventually, it also serviced other teams that needed cross-functional information about these deals. And so it was a really cool way to see it grow. And it actually, one thing that I was really proud of, it became a template for other teams and the Airtable team actually used our base as an example to create this for other content verticals within the legal org. So it was something that I was really proud of and was really fun to build.

Ben (07:44):

Yeah, absolutely. Just connecting the dots and just saving people time. I mean, you and I can both geek out on that all day, because anytime I see a process where it's just not efficient, I'm allergic to it and I go itchy. It has to be better, right? To do it better. So your full-time job is as a Product Owner, on the Evisort team, which is a tool built for lawyers to help them save time. So can you tell us a little bit more about Evisort and the type of things that you and your team are working on?

Taly (08:12):

Yeah, so Evisort I would say has two primary product areas. They have their post signature tool and pre signature tool. And when I say that, I mean the signature of a contract. I know there are some folks here who might not think in legal terms. So just to kind of provide a little bit more color, the post signature tool, takes signed contracts and starts pulling out all this metadata automatically and makes it searchable and analyzable. A lot of what I was doing manually in previous lives. It's really, really incredible. It's AI-powered. It's super advanced. Not like I might be a little bit biased, but objectively it's one of the best in the market in terms of what it does. And so it's a really cool thing to be able to take a thousand contracts, put them into a platform, and see it pull out all of its data and things that aren't just quantifiable, but qualitative bits of information.

Taly (09:01):

And that makes it accessible for lawyers as they're continuing to work. As they're searching for things. As they're negotiating new deals. And so it's really amazing. The other side of the platform is the pre-signature tool. It's a little bit younger, it launched a year and a half ago, I would say. And it's what helps lawyers essentially intake requests from other teams and process them all the way through signature. And that's where it goes into the post signature portion. It's newer. It's something that we still are doing a lot of work on. I actually own that product area along with our Salesforce integration. So it's kind of cool to be able to work on our product that is still in its nascent stage and be able to morph it from there.

Ben (09:40):

Yeah, absolutely. And in those early days, I assume customer feedback is quite imperative to what you're working on. So how do you all manage that feedback and kind of work with that?

Taly (09:49):

We get a ton of customer feedback both directly and from our customer success team and our sales team. We get it through Slack. We get it through email. We get it on the phone. We get it through all the mediums. And right now we use Productboard to organize all of it in terms of making sure it's all logged and tagged to different features. And then what I do is essentially create categories of different things, whether it's the intake process, the actual form, the template, how our notifications work. And so I start categorizing it and organizing it based on thematic functions and then looking across them and saying, "Okay, where are we getting a ton of feedback? Where are we getting less feedback?" And then I use that to prioritize, "Okay. If we're getting a lot of feedback about notifications and how people are not able to leverage them how they want to, maybe we should look at that as an example and start enhancing that to move their product forward."

Ben (10:39):

Yeah, exactly. Kind of seeing the aggregate and seeing where the most focus is. Where the most attention is. Absolutely. Now with your work there at Evisort, do you have any processes that you've built out to help your team save time?

Taly (10:54):

So processes at Evisort, I think one thing that was a particular pain point when I joined was how do we share information about product developments both internally, cross-functionally, and then externally. One thing that I was super excited to try that I learned from Netflix is essentially internal newsletters from the product team about releases. And so we started with a manual version of it just to see if folks like the information that came from it. Essentially we had a weekly release schedule or every two weeks, whatever it was. We just essentially gathered all the tickets, wrote lay person's terms of what it actually was, and then shared that out internally. And then we eventually automated that using Jira and various things like that or various tools. So that way nobody had to actually go through manually. And we had to add a bunch of fields in Jira.

Taly (11:43):

Do we actually wanna announce this one? Do we wanna translate this into a different description than what it is by default? And so there were some kind of additions and changes we had to do to our systems to make it work. But once we were able to do that, now it's just a weekly trigger that sends out weekly automated updates internally. And then our go-to-market team can translate that for external purposes. Our sales team is aware of any updates. And so it's a really cool way to information share more efficiently than we were before.

Ben (12:10):

Yeah. I don't think that could be understated of just that internal communication of everybody aware what's going on, what's changing in the app, and what's happening. And especially from the customer success and customer support teams knowing what's happening. It's really awesome that you were able to build that out and then automate it because if we're spending time doing it, let's figure out a way to have it work better for us. Really cool to hear. So, you know, you are the founder of this side business that you're working on. This voice-first dating app, which is called Blink. So how did you come up with the idea and get things started with that?

Taly (12:46):

Yeah, so the idea was actually inspired by a dinner experience at a blackout restaurant that I had many years ago. I dined in the dark with total strangers, having no idea what they looked like, and got the chance to talk to them and get to know them without any assumptions about who they were, whether we were gonna get along, and it was incredible. We just had a really open conversation. The whole restaurant in fact was super vulnerable and open. There was a birthday and I have never heard a restaurant burst out in song at the degree that they did that night. And I think it's because when you're shrouded in darkness and nobody can see you, you kind of lose some of your inhibitions. And so it was a beautiful evening. And after the dinner ended, I saw my table mates for the first time and I realized, had I seen them beforehand, I would've written them off as people that we wouldn't have much in common with and I would have been wrong and it would've been a real shame.

Taly Matiteyahu Quote 1

Taly (13:36):

And so since then I've had this kind of idea percolating in my mind of how can we leverage these sorts of experiences and get to know people for who they are rather than what they look like and make deeper connections as a result. Because we're so frequently writing people off based on their hair color, their height, their skin color, to be honest. Our ethnicity, genders, we have all of these assumptions wrapped in based on visual cues and, you know, maybe we could get to know people for deeper things. And so I started working on it right around the start of the pandemic, initially thinking it would be a live event experience. Pivoted from that very quickly because COVID really took over and kind of just required some changes. But I'm actually super excited about building it as an app because that means it's a far more scalable solution to this problem and something that people can experience no matter where they are and where they live. So yeah that's a little bit about how it came to be and how I came to start working on it.

Ben (14:32):

The courage to dine in the dark. I mean that that's beyond me because I have a lot of food picadillos that I don't know what I'd be eating and I'd just have anxiety. But it's really awesome that it was a life-altering event for you because now you're building this app and really pushing the boundaries of that. And I love the scalability because yeah, having an in-person event is great, but now you can impact the whole world, which is really, really cool. So we've heard from the founders of YouCanBook.me that building a software product is a ton of work. Many ups and downs. So what have been some big wins that you've seen with Blink and where do you see that app going?

Taly (15:09):

Yeah, so one of our early wins was our podcast and how well that did. So while we were thinking about this concept, we wanted to validate are people gonna like this? Do people wanna date this way? And we did a proof of concept podcast, season one, and we're actually doing season two now that we had daters, complete strangers, sign up and we matched them for dates. And we were shocked because even the people who didn't wanna continue the conversation with their partner still wanted to repeat the experience. And that was to us a sign like, okay, you know, it's fine that people aren't matching necessarily. It's still a better way to date. It's a way to date that people are enjoying. And in addition to that, it was a great tool to be able to show other people this is what it's like to go on a voice-only date.

Taly (15:51):

This is what this means. This is what the experience can be. You can actually make a real connection in 10 minutes or rule out a connection in 10 minutes. And so that was a really awesome experience to be able to kind of host that. Get that validation, and continue building on it. So we're going into season two and that's super exciting for us. Another really big win that was very recent, we finally got our app approved by the App Store. It took a lot of back and forth. It took a lot longer than we honestly expected. So we're super excited to be able to finally launch the app and see it kind of grow at scale and do our beta in Los Angeles and eventually launch in other cities. So super big and exciting things on the horizon for us that we're really looking forward to.

Ben (16:38):

Yeah. I love the proof of concept of the Date in a Blink podcast because you're like, let's put two strangers together. See what happens. Now on that, do you give them prompts to talk about or is it just like good luck? We're just sitting here. We're all listening.

Taly (16:54):

We give them one prompt. We start, it's a 10-minute date. So it's super quick and we give them one prompt. We let them know they can answer it or not if, you know, they hate it. And most of them answer it. Some of them spend a lot of time on it. Some of them are like, "Hey, we answered it. Let's move on to other things." But it helps break the ice. And it also helps shift them away from the typical topics, which, you know, what do you do for a living and things like that, which are helpful to know in some regards. But when you're trying to get to know someone as a prospective partner, it isn't necessarily determinant of whether or not you're compatible. And so we think it's a good way to get people onto a different conversation.

Ben (17:29):

Yeah. I've listened to a few episodes and you can kind of tell immediately when they're jiving and when they're not. And it's really great. It's awesome to listen to. So anybody that's listening to this should check out Date in a Blink. It's really great to experience that. I don't know if I'd have the courage. Fortunately, you know, I've been married for nearly a decade, so I don't have to worry about dating or any of the apps or anything, but I don't think I'd survive if that was the case. So I imagine the team at Blink is very small, so I'd love to learn how you are able to do that. What other processes are you working on or what do you have in place to help you do more?

Taly (18:06):

Yeah, so we actually use Asana at Blink and it is incredibly helpful. We very easily can assign each other things and stay in touch about what the other person is doing. There's only a team of two of us right now, and we have some other people helping with other tasks, like podcast editing. We have an intern. So we have a couple more people on our Asana board. But it's a pretty small team and it helps us kind of stay on top of what we have to do and what other people are able to execute as well, which has a trickle effect obviously when we're working on larger projects. Beyond that, from our perspective, process is sort of like our traffic signals. There's not a lot of traffic on our highway right now, so we don't need a ton of it, but I imagine as we grow and as we scale, we'll definitely need that. And I'm excited, obviously I love processes where processes are needed. And so I'm excited to be able to kind of see where we need improvements and efficiencies and apply processes as needed.

Ben (19:00):

Yeah. I'm sure as you grow, there'll be more time for that. And then internal documentation. All that good stuff, that again, only a handful of people that want to geek out about, right? But I love all that. It's all good stuff. So do you have any advice for someone looking to start a side business while working full time as you're doing it and you've done in the past too?

Taly Matiteyahu Quote 2

Taly (19:21):

Yeah. So a tip that my law professor once gave a handful of us, and this was in connection to her having a child, but it applies, I think, broadly: there's never a good time. You just have to take the plunge. In her case, she had a child while she was a Supreme Court clerk. She had a busy, busy life and she still did it. And that was because she wanted to. And I think the same applies here. Building a startup is sort of like having a baby. It's a ton of work. Everyone's gonna give you advice, even if you don't ask it. It's something that can be really scary and daunting, but you just have to take the plunge and dive in and know that you'll figure things out as you go through it.

Taly (20:01):

And then the other thing that I would say is start small. Set realistic goals and break down tasks. Because it's one thing to think, "I wanna build X, Y, Z thing that's gonna change the world." That's an incredible goal. But if you keep thinking about that as your step one, you're never gonna get there because it's too big. And so start small and say, "Okay, what do I have to do to get to that lofty goal?" I need to figure out, if I'm building an app, who's gonna build it for me, or can I build it myself? Am I gonna go to a bootcamp? Am I gonna start looking for other people to do it for me? Then I need to start asking people for recommendations and having these conversations. Think small and set small milestones. And if you're working full-time simultaneously, be realistic and kind to yourself because you're not gonna be able to build as fast as other people might expect. Some people might say it should take only three months to do something. If it takes you six or eight or ten, because you're doing other things, that's okay. You should know that that's normal and you don't have to meet other people's expectations in order to meet your own. And so be kind to yourself and just dive in and enjoy the journey.

Taly Matiteyahu Quote 3

Ben (21:08):

Great advice. There's never a good time. So just start and in every journey of a thousand steps, you know, it starts with one. So chip away at it and just figure out what that next step is. Because I imagine, you know, with you and your app, you have a big vision for it, but you're like, "What's that next thing we have to do?" And get the app into Apple. That's a big step there. Yes, you did it. So I'd love to drill a bit further into your personal productivity. So what are the one or two things that you have in place that are the biggest impact on managing your busy life? So what you talked about the to-do list, but anything a bit more that we could drill into there?

Taly (21:50):

I think the thing about the to-do lists that I just wanna emphasize, because they really are what helped me with my productivity across the board, is once I put something in my to-do list, it's completely gone from my active memory. I don't think about it again. And that really helps me focus on the things that I need to do and the exact moment. Knowing that I'm not forgetting anything. I don't have to worry about anything else. And I know just by having the system that whenever it is that I set that reminder, it's gonna come back up and I'll either deal with it then or find a better time for it. And so I think that's the thing that really works well for me, the ability to focus on the now by putting everything else in a different bucket.

Taly Matiteyahu Quote 4

Taly (22:29):

And so that's, for me, the biggest benefit of using to-do lists. The other thing is I design a lot of things in my life for efficiency purposes. Whether it's where you put things in the kitchen, which might be something everyone does. Or how I organize our furniture. Where we put our dog stuff. Everything is just to be more efficient. And sometimes I feel almost a neurosis because I'm like, "Oh, this could be in a better place or this could be better. And I should build or find a very specialized item to hang this thing in this one place." But it's something that I honestly enjoy and it brings me a lot of happiness once I get things into that optimal state. And yeah, those are my two things.

Ben (23:13):

Now two follow-up questions with that. With the to-do list, is it just one giant to-do list that you're working through or do you have different ones for say your full-time job, your personal life, and then Blink. How do you manage those buckets?

Taly (23:25):

I do have different ones. So I use reminders on the Mac for all my personal stuff. I use Asana for my day job and for Blink. And I used to use Monday for work at Netflix when I was there. So I've used all the different tools. I've tried other ones. I do like compartmentalizing it, but would love also being able to bring them together so I could see across my full day. What is everything? But for now, the compartmentalization is working really well.

Ben (23:53):

Nice. And the second question is, was this always a skill that you had of just finding inefficiencies and fixing them from a younger age? Do you remember the first time that you were like, "Oh, this is an idea for me to do this better." I imagine you, the kid on the playground being like, "Well, let's play this game this way and you can stand over there and we can make it all different."

Taly (24:12):

You know, I think so. I'm trying to think of an example from my youth. Actually, when I was in high school, I was really close to one teacher. And I remember over the summer, like in those early days where the teachers have to come in, but the students don't, I actually went in and helped one of my teachers organize her classroom. And I don't know why I did it. I don't know if she asked me. I don't know if I offered. I don't remember, but I just remember I got a couple of friends and we just spent the day organizing this classroom. And it just brought me so much joy to put things in their proper places with other things that are alike and make the space more welcoming and happy. So I like organizing things both digitally and tangibly. For me, it just was something that makes me happy. I don't really know exactly why. Maybe seeing the end result of the process, but it's just kind of fun and I find it really rewarding.

Ben (25:02):

Yeah. And awesome that you're leaning into that any chance you get. You're like, "We can make this better. We could do it differently." It's really great that you're not in the shadows worrying about that. So you mentioned a little bit earlier about scaling Blink and kind of getting that launch. So I'd love to hear, what's next for you in that journey?

Taly (25:22):

Yeah so the beta is gonna be next, which I'm really excited about. It's been a long time coming. I'm hoping also one day to be able to go full-time on Blink. So that'll be a big next step. And then season two of Date in a Blink, like I said. We're recording the episodes now. We're also recording episodes with relationship experts this season to talk about the different dates that we're hosting. So that's really fun to be able to add to it and have it grow. And then fundraise for Blink. That's another really big one. So we're hoping to raise our first round and be able to leverage that in launching our LA broader launch post beta and then beyond. So super excited for all of those things. I know it's a lot, but I'm also gonna use all of these things that I usually do to stay on top of it all. And I'm super excited for all of it.

Ben (26:10):

Yeah. That sounds like an exciting next year for you of getting some pitches out of the way. Getting some investors. That's really great to get some runway, to really scale things up. Excited for Date in a Blink as well. I'm gonna be binging all those episodes because it's really, some of them are cringy, but it's also really awesome to just see people being vulnerable and just getting to know each other I hope on a real personal level.

Taly (26:33):

I hope when you say cringy, you mean like the, "Oh, this isn't working," not cringy like, "Oh this is terrible."

Ben (26:40):

Exactly. Like it's not working. You're like, "Oh, that's, that's not a good match," you know? Because you can spot it right away of just the mannerisms of people as they're talking. But, you know, I'm sure people will find that in the app too, which is great because it's a real quick way to find out who you're compatible with without all the other biases, as you mentioned. Yeah, so where can people go to learn more about everything that you're working on?

Taly (27:02):

So for more info on Date in a Blink, folks can find us on social at Date in a Blink. They can also go to dateinablink.com if they wanna sign up and participate themselves. For more info on Blink date, they can find us at the Blink date on all of the socials, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, all of those good things, and also our website's www.theblinkdate.com. And then if folks wanna connect with me and talk about anything productivity or organization or anything like that, they can find me on LinkedIn. I'm always excited to talk about those things too.

Ben (27:32):

Yeah. Great. We'll add all the links to the blog post that we'll be putting up with this. So I wanna thank you so much for giving me your time because you're so busy. And filling us in on everything that you're doing to manage your life and make it a lot less chaotic and chip away at those big goals. So really, really thank you for being on Get More Done. And it was a pleasure talking with you.

Taly (27:52):

Thank you so much for having me.

Ben (27:54):

All right. Have a good one. Bye. Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoyed this episode of Get More Done. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite platform to get updates of future episodes. Wanna be a guest? Reach out to community@youcanbook.me or visit, getmoredone.youcanbook.me. If you or your team want to automate your scheduling, sign up for a free two-week trial at YouCanBook.me. What will you do with all the time that you save?

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